covid-19 Education

COVID-19 EDUCATION

For the continued safety of patients, providers, staff and the community, TCFP has implemented visitor restrictions in our facility.  We continue to evaluate the visitor policy at TCFP.

We understand that coming to a medical appointment alone may cause some concern.  To help feel more comfortable as you prepare for your visit, please review the tips below.

To learn more about recommended home care, click HERE.   

For the latest updates from the Harris County Department of Public Health & Environment click HERE

IMPORTANT INFO

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  • You should make us aware prior to any visit to our office.
  • You must be properly triaged and you should not enter our facility without PPE (personal protective equipment).
  • You may be instructed to call us from the parking lot upon arrival.

 

  • Patients are properly screened for COVID-19 and separated our schedules to see healthy patients and sick patients at certain times during the day.  Anyone exhibiting symptoms during “healthy hours” will be triaged for care or asked to return home.  Patient will have to reschedule
  • We thoroughly clean our facilities throughout the day with alcohol or bleach-based cleaners. Hand sanitizer dispensers are available throughout our facility.  Our staff are highly trained, up-to-date, and compassionate. They will help to guide you through troubled waters.
  • Everyone must maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from each other unless they are giving or receiving direct patient care.  This policy is supported with:
  • Modified seating plans in waiting areas and common spaces.
  • The placement of signs in waiting areas to indicate appropriate spacing.
  • We have a patient only policy, (1 guardian for minors)
  • Many patients that present with symptoms actually have the flu or another virus. We can help lead you to a proper diagnosis. 
  • We hired a company to disinfect our entire suite using approved COVID-19 disinfectants on a quarterly basis.
  • Additional screening that include face to face and over the phone screenings.
  • We are started a telemedicine program to allow certain patients the opportunity for remote care.
  • Because we feel confident in our screening process and infection controls, we will continue to serve patients in all of our facility. 

Do you know when your illness is urgent or emergent? While sometimes the answer to this may seem slightly complex, knowing the difference could save your life. Here are some basic guidelines to help you make the right decision.

If a medical illness or injury is life or limb threatening or involves severe bodily damage, patients should go directly to the Emergency Room.  An Urgent Care’s level of treatment is not equipped or capable of providing ER care. Examples of when to go to the Emergency Room include:

  • Coughing or vomiting blood
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Drug overdoses
  • Head or spinal injury
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Poisoning
  • Serious burns
  • Severe wounds and amputations
  • Signs of heart attack
  • Signs of stroke
  • Sudden vision changes
  • Uncontrolled bleeding
  • Vaginal bleeding with pregnancy

Urgent Care facilities are designed to treat illness or injury that are non-life threatening. Urgent Care facilities specialize in quick treatment for minor emergencies. Urgent Care is less costly and a much quicker alternative to the Emergency Room.  An Urgent Care visit is appropriate for:

  • Bladder infections
  • Bug bites or small animal bites
  • Cough or sore throat
  • Ear pain
  • Mild fevers
  • Minor burns
  • Rashes
  • Sprains or minor injuries
  • Pink eye or other minor eye problems
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

If you are unsure if you should visit the ER or an urgent care, call us at (713) 341-2100 opt. 2!

Our office is committed to maintaining a safe environment for everyone.  We appreciate your corporation in helping meet this goal.

About COVID-19 Booster Vaccines

COVID-19 Booster Vaccines

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At this time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that individuals who are
moderately to severely immunocompromised receive an additional dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine
(Pfizer or Moderna) at least 28 days after their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.
Individuals who are moderately to severely immunocompromised may benefit from an additional dose of
the vaccine to ensure they have enough protection against the COVID-19 virus.

  • Active treatment for solid tumor and hematologic malignancies
  • Receipt of solid-organ transplant and taking immunosuppressive therapy
  • Receipt of CAR-T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (within 2 years of transplantation or taking immunosuppression therapy)
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (e.g., DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress immune response

At this time, the CDC does not recommend additional COVID-19 vaccines doses (booster) for any other
population. However, the CDC is preparing to offer a coronavirus booster vaccination for all Americans
eight months after receiving their second shot of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine as early as midSeptember.

According to the CDC, the authorization of an extra COVID-19 vaccine only applies to Pfizer or
Moderna vaccine for individuals with a compromised immune system does not apply to individuals who
received the J&J/Janssen vaccine. Currently there is not enough data to determine whether
immunocompromised people who received the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine also have an improved
antibody response following an additional dose of the same vaccine.

Individuals who received either Pfizer or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine series, a third dose should be
the same vaccine product as your initial two doses Pfizer or Moderna. If Pfizer or Moderna is not
available, the other vaccine product may be administered.

Yes, we ask patients to call our office to schedule an appointment. TCFP does not have the Pfizer
vaccine. Patients that received the Pfizer vaccine should contact the place where they received the last
two vaccines. Or, you may contact your local pharmacy or nearest hospital for more information
regarding the Pfizer booster vaccine.

Yes, people who qualify for an additional COVID-19 vaccine are required to bring their COVID-19
vaccination card to verify the vaccine product and the appropriate timing of the additional dose.


Note: Prior to receiving your booster vaccine, you will be asked to complete an
attestation form confirming that you meet the criteria for receiving an additional dose of
the COVID-19 vaccine. It is required to bring your COVID-19 vaccination card with you
to verify the vaccine product and the appropriate timing of the additional dose.

Tips for Patients Arriving for Appointments

Visitor Restrictions Due to COVID-19

self-screening covid-19

Disclaimer: This self-screening does not provide a medical diagnosis and is for informational purposes only. The information contained in the self-screening is for your personal use only and is not intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease or other conditions and is not intended to provide a determination or assessment of your state of health. If you have concerns regarding your health, or the health of someone else, you should consult a physician. If you are experiencing a serious health emergency you should call 911.

Please answer all the required questions marked with * 

Close contact is defined as either: 1) “Prolonged period of time” spent “within approximately 6 feet (2 meters) or within the room or care area” of an individual who has tested positive for COVID-19 or 2) “Direct contact with fluids from the nose or mouth of an individual who has tested positive for COVID-19.” Examples include sharing eating or drinking utensils, close conversation, or kissing, hugging, and other direct physical contact. “Close contact” does not include activities such as walking by a person or briefly sitting across a waiting room or office.

Disclaimer: This self-screening does not provide a medical diagnosis and is for informational purposes only. The information contained in the self-screening is for your personal use only and is not intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease or other conditions and is not intended to provide a determination or assessment of your state of health. If you have concerns regarding your health, or the health of someone else, you should consult a physician. If you are experiencing a serious health emergency you should call 911.